More Help Wanted!

Thanks to any of you who helped out Klaus and his dissertation needs by completing the automotive blogs survey. Another, and different, request for assistance has come in and I thought maybe some of the European visitors to this site might be able to help.

Ronny has emailed me and told me the rather sad story of his 1995 Saab 9000 Griffen. The car was an exquisite example of Saab’s highest luxury offering of the time and apparently, was originally a gift from the Swedish government to someone special in Norway.

Unfortunately Ronny and the Griffen were rear-ended a few days ago. Thankfully, Ronny and his young daughter were uninjured, but the same can’t be said or the Griffen, which is quite likely to be written off by his insurance company.

The problem is, the insurance company doesn’t have a market value for a Saab 9000 Griffen. They have numbers for the Saab 9000 but not for the Griffen model, saying that it wasn’t sold in their market (I assume it’s in Norway). Ronny needs to find some market values.

If any of you Europeans know for sure whether the 9000 Griffen was sold in Norway, and at what price, I’m sure Ronny would find that useful to take to the insurance company.

Ronny – I’d enquire with Saab in Norway and see what they can tell you.

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For what it’s worth, the Saab 9000 Griffen sold for A$87,900 here in Australia when new in 1995 and a top condition, low mileage example is rated at A$7,300 today for a private sale.

Hope that helps.

9000griffin_037.jpg

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10 Comments

  1. “and a top condition, low mileage example is rated at A$7,300 today for a private sale.”

    If you can find one!! BTW a local dealer is asking $14,000 for a ’94 Aero with 150,000km. SO I think that’s an optimistic price for a Griffen. For some reason the prices for 9000s are pretty high these days.

  2. “Unfortunately Ronny and the Griffen were rear-ended a few days ago. Thankfully, Ronny and his young daughter were uninjured, but the same can’t be said or the Griffen, which is quite likely to be written off by his insurance company.”

    It happens, unfortunately.

  3. Can’t he just figure out the exchange rate between his country and a country it was sold in and give that to the insurance company?

    Figure on your call of $7,300 Australian, and if he’s in Norway, that comes out to exactly $35,967.06 in Kroners.
    Can’t he just show the math on that and bring it to the insurance?

  4. Turbin, I’d say that dealer’s being very ambitious. There’s a silver 9000 Aero down here for sub-10K. Looks alright.

    Ben, you not getting your Aero back?

    Matt, I don’t think a direct price in Aussie dollars and then converted would be accurate for the scandinavian market. A) they’re more expensive here to purchase new, and b) there’s more of them over there, which may effect the price too. Hence the appeal for some local knowledge.

  5. Hi guys!

    Thank you all for your ideas and help. I can see that the prices in the second hand car market in Norway reflects the outrageous price-level for new cars :|!

    Via Saab Norway (GM actually…) and some digging around found that the car was priced at 656 400 NOK in 1995, in Norway. 656 400 NOK is about 133 247 AUD(!) (using the currency converter at http://www.xe.com/ucc/).

    Meanwhile, it also now seems that the insurance agency is actually considering repairing it. They are acknowledging that this is a rare and special item, and hence the old 2.3T comparisons they used is now thrown over board. It seems that my Griffin is one of the only ones left in Norway actually. Repair costs are about 100 000 NOK (!), which amounts to just about what I paid six months ago (96 000 NOK)…

    So, I guess the prices differ quite substantially in markets around the world. Good for you, not so good for us Norwegians though :(.

    I am surprised how few of the Griffins that are still around. I guess I should ask the Swedish Saab headquarters for actual production statistics on this one. It would certainly be interesting to know. Maybe sales were weak?

    Again, thank you all for your help. It was most appreciated!

    I cross my fingers at this stage hoping for the Griffin to be repaired – as long as the repairs are quality work, of course… I’ll post some pics of it if/when fixed :).

    Regards,
    Ronny

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