Some Saab production numbers

We have a little database here and I was able to get a few numbers out of it (OK, not me, but someone who was very kind and helpful). I thought those numbers might be interesting for a few people to look at.

These are production numbers from 1950 up until the end of 2010. They include Saabs built outside of Trollhattan, as well as vehicles built in Trollhattan that didn’t wear a Saab badge (hello, Cadillac BLS). There are some test vehicles included here as well, which are earlier than some might expect.

[table id=2 /]

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For those of you who like this sort of thing, I’ll try and dig into some of these numbers in a little more detail for the future. The amount of granularity is not quite what you might expect as a consumer because it’s written from a factory point of view (i.e. looking for Viggen numbers isn’t as simple as looking for something that says ‘Viggen’, it means a 9-3 between certain years with a 2.3T engine).

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34 Comments

        1. I doubt it, and here’s why:  the market demands faster, shorter product development cycles to stay competitive.  At Saab’s annual output of tens of thousands each year it will take 10+ years to make half a million of any one model.

          It’s difficult to imagine a Saab that would do hundreds of thousands of units each year.  That’s what it would take.

  1. wooww the 99 has been one of the most produced Saab ever ! Where are they all gone ?
    The same with the 95 : 110000 units .How many are still running today ? Not a lot even in Sweden .

  2. Interesting stats! Also interesting to work out the average per year. Shows that the 900/9-3 range is the biggest seller.

    But 99 produced up to 1994 – after the 900 (gen 1) finished? That does surprise me!

  3. Love that kind of numbers looking a bit further then the short view 😉 They are like an invitation to breath the history of a powerful brand like Saab definitely is.

    Glad to see that the 900/9-3 genI made the greatest level per year : it surely inheritated a really strong commercial image (and hi selling volume) given by the 900 genI and the 9000 at the time.

    Be told for the next “9-something” 9-3 type ! ok? 😉
    Cheers

    1. It was certainly sold as a 1994 model.  I’m not totally sure when they were built, though.  These numbers are from our internal database so one would assume they’re correct, but it’s an interesting point.

    1. Yesterday you told us there was bad stuff to happend (for sure)
      That didn’t happend. The response from Swade yesterday was to watch the development unfold the coming days. I feel exactly the same way today as I did end of jan 2009. Strangly it is a worriyng but still positive feeling.
      I think that you read the news as it was facts.

      1. Since SAAB doesnt communicate with anyone not even the dealers! We have to read the papers and I also might add that Metall said that they would file for bankrupcy today and they didnt then the lie is with them not with me!!

        1. Sorry if I offended you, that was not my intention. The point was just that we cannot take what the press says as a facts. The only ones we need to here from at this point is saab. And the silince gives me hope.
          The silence indicates that talks are in progress, and that is good.

          1. Silence to the press is good, silence to the real interested parties is bad, but they seem to talk to, at least, the unions otherwise they wouldn’t have changed their minds.

  4. How many 9-3 (gen 2) where build in 2010, and how many in 2009?
    And how many 9-5 (gen 1) where build during 2009?

    Nevertheless it looks like the “GM Saabs” have been the most successful models.

  5. Steve, any idea how many 900 SPGs were made? I think that my 1989 Million Mile SPG was one of 856 that year. One factoid was that I took delivery on 30 November 1989. That was the last day that SAAB was truly independent. The very next day, 1st December 1989 GM took over. 

    What a history if that car was the last SAAB sold as a 100% SAAB and went on to make more? I wonder if it is possible to trace the workers who built her (through the VIN and interview them). That would be quite a story. Maybe Peter at the Museum could help?

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